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    Food for thought

    In this article I am going to share some insight from work we’ve been doing at infoboss that could potentially save your organisation a lot of money…

    The picture for this blog is a picture of some fruit, cherries. The picture is perfectly able to convey my message that this is in fact a food stuff, cherries. The picture is saved as a JPG file format at 640×480 pixel resolution and occupies circa 80KB on my hard disk. A similar picture taken on a high resolution camera occupies 8MB or more on my hard disk. I’m happy to keep the smaller version, because I only need it to convey the message that it is a picture of some fruit, potentially I could save the file at an even lower resolution for the purposes I have for it and to be honest I can also remove it, because I probably won’t want to use it again for another blog… I hear you say, where is he going with this?

    As you may know, we conduct audits on an organisation’s data – structured and unstructured, in the cloud or on-premise. We’ve done a fair few now and a couple of organisations recently illustrated an opportunity to save over 50% of their cloud disk storage. Yikes! 50%? How?

    Well…Their staff take photographs as evidence of completed jobs, 56% of their cloud storage is occupied by these files! They need to keep the image as its evidence of the job being completed. It doesn’t need to be high resolution as it is simply an image that needs to convey that the task you set the person to do has been completed. Here it is the door fitted, the tap fixed, the window pane replaced. By converting these files to lower resolution, their purpose is still fulfilled but the file size is roughly 10% of their original size. So 56% down to 5.6% i.e. saving over 50% of their cloud storage.

    If I now tell you that the storage amount to be saved in one of these cases was 52TB and the annual storage cost for this volume of data on Microsoft Azure (according to Unidata) is £177,962, then perhaps you will forgive me rambling on. Food for thought?

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